The FilmWatcher Posts

Image courtesy of CNN Films.

* ½ (out of 4)

It’s hard to overstate just how big an impact Ruth Bader Ginsburg has had on American society. Back in the ’70s, the now-85-year-old Supreme Court justice already earned a claim to fame with her advocacy in landmark cases like Frontiero v. Richardson. When she arrived at the high court in the ’90s, she only further cemented her place in history with her opinions in cases like U.S. v. Virginia. And now, in the sunset of her life, Ginsburg has also become the most unlikely of pop culture icons, a “notorious” celebrity who’s referenced just as often in Hollywood blockbusters as in law reviews.

Ginsburg’s story, in short, is the kind that practically begs to be recounted, dissected, and interpreted on the silver screen. Unfortunately, however, Julie Cohen and Betsy West’s new documentary RBG proves woefully ill-equipped for the task.

Reviews - New Releases/Festivals

Image courtesy of Bleecker Street.

** ½ (out of 4)

Like the other movie Sebastián Lelio released this year, A Fantastic Woman, Disobedience seeks to capture the emotional psychology of a non-heterosexual female. But while Fantastic centered on a trans Chilean singer, Disobedience’s protagonist is Ronit (Rachel Weisz), a lesbian who works as a photographer in New York. When the film opens, Ronit learns that her father (Anton Lesser), the spiritual leader of a secluded, London-based Orthodox Jewish community, has suddenly passed away. And when she returns home for his funeral, she receives still more unexpected news: Dovid (Alessandro Nivola), her father’s protégé, has gotten hitched with Esti (Rachel McAdams), a woman with whom Ronit once had a passionate, forbidden affair. 

Reviews - New Releases/Festivals

Reviews - New Releases/Festivals